Travels

Cliffs, beaches and giants in Bedruthan Steps, Cornwall

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Though Cornwall has small charming coastal villages full of culture, as St Ives or Mousehole, for me its greatest beauties are not those made by the hand of man, but those sculpted by Mother Nature.

The Cornish coast is dramatic and rugged. Among the strong winds, the swell and the difficulty of the rock formations, it is normal that in front of it so many wrecks of shipwrecks are submerged. Under the waters of Cornwall there are galleons and pinnacles that were once part of what, they say, was the greatest naval force ever joined by man until that time: the Spanish Invincible Navy. There are also more modern warships, torpedoed or embarked during the fighting of the two world wars, and multiple fishing vessels that paid for the hard life of their trade.

In fact, diving to admire sunken wrecks is one of the most famous water sports activities in Cornwall.

Y exceptional witnesses of all those shipwrecks have been the sharp cliffs of the coast. Among them, they stand out, for their beauty and drama, those of Bedruthan and Carnewas.

Called in English Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps (the stairs - or steps - of Carnewas and Bedruthan) their names in 'cornish ' (Celtic language native to Cornwall) are much more charismatic (I don't know, maybe it's because of my second Celtic house, Ireland): Karn Havos ("Summer house rock pile") and Bos Rudhen ("Place where the reds live").

The path that runs along this beautiful coastal stretch that runs between Padstow and Newquay is simple and rewards you with spectacular views.

How to get to Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps

To get to this wonder of nature you can do it by train (if you fly to London) or plane to Newquay (There are about 11 km from the cliffs to the train station of this English town that also houses the main Cornish airport).

From Newquay, you can take bus number 56 (First Kernow) from Newquay to Padstow.

If you decide to rent a car, you will find the path that you must follow along the secondary road B3276.

History of Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps

Although I discovered this place in October 2018, the area of ​​Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps has had inhabitants since, at least, the Bronze Age. The proof of this is formed by a set of about six circular constructions that, at that time, served as a place of religious rituals or tombs. In addition, the redcliff castle - Iron Age - dominates the views of Bedruthan Steps.

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