Travels

Discovering the beaches of Malta

Pin
Send
Share
Send


The day we combed Ryanair's web looking for a sunny destination to escape from the gray skies of Dublin, we opted for Malta for its location - which almost ensured a few days of good weather - and the low price of the ticket. When we gave the "OK" to confirm the purchase, we did not know what kind of beaches we were going to find on the island. The surprise was very, very pleasant.

In our short stay we came to visit 4 beaches and some coves more than they could not be called "beaches" but they were of great beauty.

The first afternoon, after leaving the backpacks in our apartment, we walked to the nearest beach that marked our map: St George's Bay. Without a doubt it is the one that I liked least of all that we would see during our stay. Although it is sandy and the water is clean and of an intense blue, it is located right next to the promenade and the road, being also quite full of people given its proximity to the area of ‚Äč‚Äčapartments, pubs, restaurants and hotels of St Julian's I do not recommend it, unless, like us, you are staying in that area and you want to sunbathe and take a bath without having to take the bus or car.

The second day we took bus 652 from St Julian's and 40 minutes later we got off at the golden bay beach, in the limits of Mgarr to the Northwest of the island. Also of sand and larger than St. George's, Golden Bay is a good beach but also quite busy, especially in high season. It has a couple of small bars where they serve all kinds of drinks, ice cream and fast food. The water was freezing, but a lightning shower fell. Shortly after lunch, we picked up our things and went down the path that climbed a small mound.

On the other side of it is the Ghajn Tuffieha Beach, similar to its neighbor but more elongated and narrow and of greater natural beauty. There is a path that goes down to the beach but also forks on other roads that lead, after walking down the hillside, to other small coves. One of them left us regretting not having found her before, since it was already getting dark. Down below we saw flat rock tongues that went deep into the blue sea. To access it you must lower a loose stone scree and only a few people sunbathed in that area. Without a doubt, the best we saw that day.

After seeing more conventional beaches, on the third day we decided to leave for a bit of adventure and fumble looking Mgiebah bay, described on the holidays-malta website as a small sandy cove of difficult access and great natural beauty. We took 62 towards Mellieha and we got off in the city. There was a stop closest to Mgiebah Bay but they are not marked on the map and the drivers do not stop if there is no one and do not notify. The rural road that descends to the cove is difficult to find and we walked several times through authentic fields of weeds and stones. Finally we found it and managed to reach the cove. The water was beautiful but the tide had dragged bottles and other debris to the shore. The place was very quiet and we found a bunker from World War II, one of the many that populate the coast of this island that was a strategic key during this world confrontation.

Pin
Send
Share
Send